Choosing a TMS: The Hidden Risks of Choosing “Generic” Software

Choosing a TMS: The Hidden Risks of Choosing “Generic” Software

Generic software is simple to use and built for a broad number of potential use cases, but that does not make it the best choice when choosing a training management system (TMS). The unique needs of public-sector organizations are best met by software built to serve the industry—a fact that holds both in the field and in the courtroom, where a lack of effective documentation can bring down even the most stringent training policies. This whitepaper will discuss the hidden and not-so-hidden downsides of “going generic” when considering a TMS by contrasting their value against purpose-built solutions, with topics that touch several aspects of first-response life: fieldwork, cybersecurity, certification, and learning exercises, among others.

Generic software is simple to use and built for a broad number of potential use cases, but that does not make it the best choice when choosing a training management system (TMS). The unique needs of public-sector organizations are best met by software built to serve the industry—a fact that holds both in the field and in the courtroom, where a lack of effective documentation can bring down even the most stringent training policies. This whitepaper will discuss the hidden and not-so-hidden downsides of “going generic” when considering a TMS by contrasting their value against purpose-built solutions, with topics that touch several aspects of first-response life: fieldwork, cybersecurity, certification, and learning exercises, among others.

The National Decertification Index (NDI) is a national registry of police officers whose law enforcement credentials have been revoked due to misconduct.

For more than 10 years, the NDI has provided police departments, state agencies, and other organizations with decertification data about potential hires.