City officials and first responders are working hard to improve systems and public safety with the adoption of new technology. Emergency Management Magazine reported that the city of Danville, Virginia, is currently renovating its emergency responder network by switching from a privately owned copper line infrastructure to a city-owned microwave system. 

Before this recent adoption, the city and most of the region relied on copper line networks for its police, fire and public works radio systems. The switch to a mobile radio service system is expected to allow all responders send clearer voice transmissions over the network and transfer larger amounts of data. With over 1,000 employees using the emergency responder network with handheld or mobile radios, it was important to build an infrastructure that could support traffic volumes. 

In addition to providing better quality service with clearer voice signals, the solution will also save the city money on its operational budget. It's also important to note that FCC regulation updates also required the town to make the switch to a different system.

"With the microwave network, there was an option to save money for the city by not having to pay a monthly fee," Danville's Administrative Division Director Barry Doebert told the news source. "And it had more capability to expand for the future." 

By standardizing and removing silos from the communication process, the department has improved interoperability if a crisis was to ever occur. The switch from a copper network to the new microwave network is expected to improve response times due to increased clarity and thereby boost final outcomes in emergencies. Investing in technologies that reduce operational expenses and improve first responder performance is a crucial element to any department's continued mission. 

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