Public Safety News and Topics

Lessons from 9/11: Putting health and safety first

Before 9/11, the term, “first responder,” was not widely used, if at all. The term came into common usage in the wake of that horrific day in 2001 to describe the thousands of public health and safety personnel — firefighters, police, EMTs, and others — who responded to the scene of the terrorist attacks, particularly the devastation of the World Trade Center’s Twin Towers in New York. While some object to the overuse of the “first responder” term by the media, saying it is more accurate to specify exactly which agencies responded to an incident, the term has continued to be important in addressing the long-term effects of the terrorist attacks on the emergency personnel who were present at Ground Zero.

2019-09-11T10:46:32-04:00September 10th, 2019|EMS, Fire & Rescue, Public Safety|

Body Cameras, Perception, and Optics: Building Transparency With Smart Policy

As most law enforcement personnel are aware, body cameras are a rapidly emerging technology, but with flaws that may be overlooked by the general public. However, inconsistent recording and video retention policies can do more harm to public perception than a lack of cameras altogether.

Law Enforcement, Training, and the Value of a Proactive Approach Toward Bias

An “elephant in the room” for many well-intentioned departments, racial bias is extremely sensitive as a topic — and extremely serious as a potential threat to an agency’s stability. For departments, newfound awareness is key to avoiding embarrassing or damaging outcomes, and training – combined with enhanced delivery and documentation tools – can help get there.

An Impossible Challenge? For Corrections, Solving Complacency Starts With Culture

A worrisome issue regardless of field, the challenges inherent to employee complacency grow even more dire in the corrections industry — a field where even minor oversights can lead to serious injuries and lost lives. Worse, because it is borne from biological processes we rely on every day, there is no failsafe approach to the issue and its associated problems. By instilling a mix of cultural and procedural change, however, facilities can give themselves the best possible chance against the problem manifesting in harmful ways.

2019-07-02T13:51:35-04:00July 2nd, 2019|Corrections, Public Safety, Readiness|

Law Enforcement and Field Training: The Evolution of a Decades-Old Process for Modern Departments

Borne from a bureaucratic personnel issue turned tragedy, the San Jose Police Department’s “Field Training Plans” are arguably the most influential addition to industry training protocol in half a century—and undoubtedly the most widespread. Using their Field Training and Evaluation Program as a starting point, this paper will discuss the practice, its influence, and the positive impact technology can have in its continued evolution