Gender in First Response: How Biology and Physiology Shape Male and Female Responders

Gender politics project a considerable presence in most of the working world. So too do ills associated with gender, like sexual harassment and discrimination. The resultant effect is especially pronounced in historically male-dominated fields such as first response, where biases in hiring and testing practices have contributed to an ongoing, undeniable gender gap. Physiological, mental, and societal differences between males and females may further contribute, as can the broad, often volatile range of opinions surrounding gender issues. This paper will explore the biological and societal aspect of first response’s gender gap, reflecting on scientific research, statistical analysis, and real-world examples to provide context and factual basis; it will then discuss the benefits of a gender-aware approach to the hiring and continued employment of first responders of both genders.

Riots are Less Common, Less Deadly — and Still an Ever-Present Threat

Riots and other jailhouse violence have seen a significant drop in recent decades, this despite an ever-growing number of inmates. Though today’s riots tend to be shorter and less harmful than the deadly takeovers of the past, the threat still looms for correctional facilities, their staff, and inmates who do not engage in riots — making awareness integral to the safety of all involved.

Envisage Adds Exposure Tracker to Growing Line of First Responder Solutions

Envisage Technologies is pleased to announce its acquisition of the California-based company, VaultRMS, and the addition of the Exposure Tracker™ product to Envisage’s growing list of technology solutions built specifically for our nation’s first responders. The addition of Exposure Tracker will further Envisage’s founding vision of improving the readiness and safety of our nation’s first responder communities.

Should High Schools Teach Students How to Interact With Police?

In Texas, lawmakers recently passed a bill requiring high schools to teach their students how to interact with law enforcement. Similar measures may soon pass in New Jersey, and other states have passed laws adding traffic stop instruction to their driver’s education courses. While proponents of the courses say they are designed to inform students of their rights and increase the safety of law enforcement encounters, others contemplate whether the message is the right one.