Technology and the Fourth Amendment: Reconciling Law with the Digital Era

Technology and the tenets of American law do not always seamlessly intermesh. As several former and upcoming court cases show, the intersection between the two leads to inconsistent judicial interpretations and opinions. Getting the forces in lockstep will require patience, practice, and precedent. Considering that several emerging technologies currently operate in a gray area of Fourth Amendment jurisprudence, the need to align the two is growing.

2017-11-13T11:47:42+00:00 November 15th, 2017|Federal, Homeland Security, Law Enforcement, Legal, Local & Tribal, State|

Spoliation: Why Even the Worst Training Records Are Better than No Records at All

Failure to manage training records correctly cannot only upend a department's ability to defend itself from criminal and civil claims, but can subject it to claims of spoliation. As the definition and consequences of spoliation continue to broaden, departments must ensure that their records management policies and systems are capable of providing them with the necessary layer of legal defensibility.

Rise in body camera usage and support highlights challenges of mass implementation

As public support and grant funding continue to drive body cam adoption across the nation, departments must recognize both the challenges and limitations of implementing this technology. By investing time in policies at the outset, however, departments can effectively use body cams to manage their interactions and communications with the public.

High stakes testing: What departments must know to get a step ahead of cheaters

With information easier to share than ever before – whether through e-mail, text messaging, social media, or otherwise – recent cheating incidents involving public safety professionals serve as a grim reminder that high stakes testing procedures have not kept pace with advances in technology.

Training can reduce use of force and keep officers safer

Use of force by law enforcement remains a controversial and complex issue. Officer and suspect safety, financial impact, and public relations are all motivations for the department wanting to lower the occurrence of force. By giving officers extra training devised to lower these occurrences, departments can sate these motivations – and serve themselves, their respective citizenries, and their officers in the process.

Fire TCP Panel Discussion

The Fire Training Certification Program (Fire TCP) launch occurred on September 30, 2016. The panel was moderated by John Buckman and the panelists included: Leigh Hubbard (Executive Director of ISFSI), Steve Pegram (President of ISFSI – Chief of Goshen, OH Fire Department), Ari Vidali (CEO Envisage Technologies), Eddie Buchanan (Assistant Chief of Hanover Fire & EMS – Advisory for Fire Engineering and FDIC), and John Murphy (Legal Advisory for ISFSI).

Lessons from the court-martial: applying an impartial process to police misconduct

The current state of discipline in the police profession can be considered disorderly compared to the other professions and can affect public perception. The adoption of code of ethics and a strong, and independent misconduct review process is a potential way to overcome this challenge. This type of transparency can help to restore the public’s trust in our police officers.

Scalia’s successor may trigger changes for public safety professionals

With the Supreme Court currently deadlocked at 4-4 along partisan lines, Scalia’s successor has the potential to become the deciding vote on divisive issues. Because Scalia served as part of a 5-4 majority on several issues impacting public safety and criminal justice, the appointment and confirmation of a successor with a different constitutional interpretation could signal litigants that these areas of the law are susceptible to change.

2017-05-30T10:33:39+00:00 March 4th, 2016|Corrections, Federal, General, Law Enforcement, Legal, Public Safety|